Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Old Fashioned Candy Roaster Squash Pie


 Last fall, I posted about the heirloom Candy Roaster Squash, which is native to the Southern Appalachian Mountains, here and a Candy Roaster Pie here

Saturday, on a visit to the Western North Carolina Farmers Market in Asheville, I bought another Candy Roaster. These squash are very, very large.  The one I bought weighed about 12 pounds.  That is a lot of squash!


To approach this statuesque squash, cut in half crosswise, then cut each half again lengthwise.  Scoop out seeds and place the quarters face down on a lightly oiled baking pan.  Bake at 375 degrees approximately 45 minutes, depending on size, until tender, the skin is beginning to char and blister, and it is completely pooped.  Be sure you use a rimmed pan because these squash are juicy.




Once the squash is cool enough to handle, scoop out all the flesh from the rind.  If desired, puree in a blender until smooth. 

Pies are the traditional use of these squash and I have experimented with a few different flavor combinations. The one that seems most popular in my circles, is this one.  It is very simple and lets both the delicate flavor and the beautiful golden color of the squash shine through.

Old Fashion Candy Roaster Squash Pie
2 cups candy roaster squash puree
1/2 cup sugar
2 eggs
2 Tbsp. flour
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1 tsp. vanilla
3 Tbsp. melted butter
Your favorite pie crust

Stir all ingredients together, then beat at medium speed of electric mixer until smooth and creamy.  Pour mixture into unbaked pie crust.  Bake at 375 degrees for 45 - 55 minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.


33 comments:

  1. Beautiful pie, and interesting info in the links. It would be easy to just make it like pumpkin, which is what a lot of folks do with any squash.

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  2. Rocquie, beautiful pie and I would especially like a piece from the left bottom corner where it got just a tiny bit darker, that's my favorite :o) I've never heard of this squash so I'll click through on the links you provided to check it out!

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  3. That squash is really pretty. I love how you say to roast it until it's pooped. :) That made me smile.

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  4. Yes - roast till its pooped made me smile too ;-)
    I love how pretty your pie looks in the last photo.

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  5. OOOOOHHHH!!!! LOVE candy roasters. Your pie is BEAUTIFUL!

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  6. I was reading your profile and find you are me !!! I also love food, everything about it, cooking, preserving and most of al eating. Just met the candy roasters this year and am in love with them. My husband brought one home from work last night. I was looking for another recipe for the pies and found you. I also live in the mountains of NC in Leicester and my husband ( lucky for me) runs Christopher Farms Produce company so we have lots of strange and common food come into our kitchen... Oh last pie I made was with sweetened condensed milk, pumpkin pie spice and the roaster.. was so good...ummmmmmmm

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  7. Great recipe! I made a link on my history and food blog today.

    http://frederickdouglassopie.blogspot.com/2010/11/how-i-learned-how-to-cook-creative.html
    Best wishes,

    Fred

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  8. my roaster is waiting. NO SPICES????

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  9. Anonymous, I don't add spices because I love the flavor of the Candy Roaster. You will add whatever spices you desire in your pie cooked in your kitchen.

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  10. Every year I meet my parents and two sets of aunts and uncles for the change of seasons in the NC mountains. We have rental property up there on Beech Mtn. I make this pie every year at that time. I also bring home some candy roasters to make and freeze the puree for thanksgiving and xmas pies. I have had many friends say this is the best pie they ever had. You cant find it in the stores. Truly special and unique. Sincerely, Don

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    1. Don, the candy roaster squash is legendary around here. I look forward to finding them at the Farmers Market each year. Thank you for your comment. --Rocquie

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  11. Dear Rocquie, Every year I do the same thing. I search roadside farmers markets for candy roasters and cushaw pumpkins(squash). I remember some 20+ years ago two elderly women were working at a roadside market. I asked them what pumpkin does grandma recommend for pumpkin pies. They smiled and laughed and then recommended the cushaw. They also told me about the candy roaster. No spices I said? I wish I still had the recipe they gave me. Thus the tradition began. I would have to say that your recipe is it. Simple easy and no spices. Here it is late july and I pulled the last of my puree baggies out of the freezer. Its ok. I will get some more soon enough. Sincerely, Don

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    1. Hello Don. . .I am also looking forward to a fresh new candy roaster. Cheers, Rocquie

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  12. This is the first year I have grown the Candy Roaster -- love it! Thanks for sharing the recipe. I wasn't sure what to do with the bountiful crop, but now I know. I'm going to roast them, smash them, and freeze the puree. Then, I'm going to use them to make soups and pies! Yummy!!

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    1. This is the first year for me growing the candy roaster also but my father and grandparents grew them for years.
      Mine have done very well and I have already harvested several with the largest weighing 27 lbs.
      I planted north Georgia candy roasters and jumbo pink banana squash.
      The seeds are kinda hard to find but they are out there.
      I hope this fine old heirloom never dies out.
      One bit of advice if you plant these; give them plenty of room. The vines run a long way.

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  13. . Got a candy roaster at the Market in Asheville N.C. while on a Trip in Oct. Saved the seeds ,has anyone tried drying them to plant? I made this pie love it . Hope to try growing it.

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    1. Anon, not much of a farmer myself, but I wish you the best of luck.

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  14. where can I get the seeds? Can I send someone some $$$ to mail me a few squash?
    angelsbrewbakery@yahoo.com

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    1. I will ask around the next time I am at the Farmers Market. Maybe someone will see your inquiry here and respond. --Rocquie

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  15. My great grandmother always put a thin layer of cream cheese in the bottom before adding the candy roaster. This keeps the crust from getting soggy. I didn't taste pumpkin pie until I was an adult. I thought the person had made a terrible mistake. Candy Roaster butter is also very good.

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    Replies
    1. The cream cheese layer sounds intriguing. Candy Roaster butter, is that like apple butter? Candy Roaster cooked down for a very long time? Thanks, Rocquie

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    2. Kelly Teague, do you have a recipe for candy roaster butter? I'm looking for one.
      Also, if anyone is looking for candy roasters in western north carolina there's a bunch of them being sold now at the Mills Rivers, NC Farmers Market

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  16. My daughter in law just treated us with our first pie. She is from Etowah, NC. It was excellent! She shared with me that they pronounce it "canna-roaster".

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  17. Hj Hannah / worldsearch2@hotmail.comJanuary 18, 2016 at 4:22 AM

    I just made my first pie from a 15 pound squash, which was a gift from a friend. I saved the seeds for planting in the spring.
    My Granny, Laurie used to make these pies, but we lost her recipe, so I used your old fashioned one. It was a hit! I like your recipe best, because there are no spices to make it taste like pumpkin. Tks, Helen June - an original Appalachian Woman.

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  18. Hj Hannah / worldsearch2@hotmail.comJanuary 18, 2016 at 4:29 AM

    I just made my first pie. It was a hit & wonderfully creamy. My, Granny Laurie, used to make these pies, but we don't have a recipe, so I used yours, because it does not have spices that resemble pumpkin pie.
    The squash was a gift from a neighbor, so I saved the seeds for spring planting.
    Thx for the info,
    Helenjune-an original Appalachian Woman.

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    1. HJ, I'm glad you liked the recipe and that it was a hit. And thank you for coming back to let me know; I really appreciate it. Good luck with the spring plants! Cheers, Rocquie

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    2. Hello All,
      I make pies and such for some of our local farmer's markets here in Toronto. My next door booth buddy who grows heirloom organics brought some of these to the market last week so I bought several thinking of pies of course!
      Where have these been!
      They are fantastic.
      A little organic double cream,
      Some sweet spicing and a little maple syrup then poured into a candied pecan studded pastry crust....Devine!
      Your secret is out my southern friends!
      Rob from Toronto

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    3. Rob, your pie does sound devine!

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  19. Locally grown Candy Roasters are also being sold at Jimmy's Produce in Whittier, NC on Hwy. 74 just before you get to Cherokee, NC.

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  20. Thanks for the recipe! I can't wait to try it! Grew candy roasters this year and have just LOVED the flavor in soup. Now I want to try it in pie! Excited, too, because I'm allergic to cinnamon & this has no spices. Fantastic!

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  21. I was in Troutman,NC about 6 years ago at my cousins when he brought 3 candy roasters home and made a couple of pies with one of them. Best pie I have ever tasted. Brought some seeds home to Michigan. Planted them and ended up with a few. I had given some seeds to a friend but couldn't find the ones that I had stored. My friend came across some that she had put in a bag and forgot about. She found them this last spring and planted them. She ended up with about half a dozen candy roasters and gave me 2 of them. I cooked them down and have 4 quarts of puree. Pie is on for this holiday season. I dried the seeds. I will be growing these every spring from now on. This will be the first holiday season that I am making pies for my friends and family from these squash, boy are they in for a treat. Oh, my friend and I made some bread from these and all I have to say is it was Delicious!!!

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  22. In 1982 I planted jumbo pink banana squash just because the name intrigued me. I became absolutely addicted to the "pumpkin" pies I baked with my crop. And just steamed and mashed like potatoes or turnips but with just butter,yum. This year I bought a candy roaster when my local Whole Foods had some. The skin is a little rougher than my pb's but the taste is the same. I'm not sure if they are actually the same squash, but the pbs do well in my high altitude Colorado garden so I will keep growing them. They do take a lot of well rotted manure.

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